Two Signs That You May Have An Overactive Bladder

If you’ve never really dealt with a problem with your bladder, it can be quite easy to overlook some of the signs that an issue is brewing. You might find yourself going to the restroom much more often than you did before, and this can be a bit disconcerting. However, there are a few other signs that point to a bladder that is possibly becoming overactive. Use this information to learn more about the signs that you may have an overactive bladder.

You Experience Urinary Urgency

One of the first signs that your bladder isn’t operating in a normal way is when you frequently experience urinary urgency. Urinary urgency is a sudden need to go to the bathroom. It can come on without a warning.

It can be difficult to deal with urinary urgency. You might be working on an important project, only to find yourself overwhelmed with the need to relieve yourself. Because the feeling comes on all at once, there may even be a few times when you aren’t able to make it to the bathroom before the urine is released.

If you experience this symptom, it’s important for you to get to a medical professional right away. Many medical facilities offer overactive bladder services that can be very instrumental in helping you find the relief that you deserve.

You Wake Up Often To Use The Bathroom

Another sign that you have an overactive bladder occurs when you find yourself waking up from your sleep often because of the need to use the bathroom. This symptom, also known as nocturia, should be carefully noted if you notice it happening to you.

Understand that as you sleep your body produces less urine. This is natural because the body needs to rest and repair itself while you’re sleeping, not continuously have to get up to use the bathroom. The situation can get so bad that you might even end up being sleep deprived, especially if you’re the type of person who has a hard time getting back to sleep once you wake up. This sleep deprivation could begin to affect other areas of your life if not treated.

There is help and hope for you if you do have an overactive bladder. If either of these symptoms hit home, get to a doctor, like those at Advanced Urology Associates, so you can receive the medical assessment you need to find healing.

Learn More

Four Common Causes Of Vaginal Dryness

Vaginal dryness can get in the way of your everyday life, making you feel uncomfortable and also making intimacy less enjoyable. If you’re tired of dealing with vaginal dryness, it’s important to talk to your gynecologist and get to the bottom of whatever is causing the problem. Here’s a look at some of the most common causes.

Hormonal Changes

Are you approaching the age of onset of menopause? If you’re in your late 40s to early 50s, vaginal dryness may be a sign that menopause is just around the corner. When you approach menopause and your estrogen levels drop, your vagina responds by reducing the amount of lubrication it produces. Hormone replacement therapy can help combat this and other menopause symptoms. There are also topical estrogen creams that you can use throughout the day or just prior to intercourse in order to stimulate moisture production.

Medications

If you are taking any prescription or over-the-counter drugs on a regular basis, the dryness you’re experiencing may be a side effect. Many asthma medications and antihistamines, in particular, can cause vaginal dryness. Your doctor may recommend switching to another medication or adjusting your dose to reduce the severity of your vaginal dryness. 

Anxiety

Is your life exceedingly stressful, or do you feel some anxiety related to sexual intimacy, in particular? Anxiety can cause a lack of arousal and therefore a lack of vaginal lubrication. This can be a very complex issue. Talking through your anxiety with your partner may help you to relax, which may stimulate the production of more lubrication. In more serious cases, you may want to seek the help of a therapist or even consider seeing a psychiatrist who can prescribe anti-anxiety medications.

Irritation

Many soaps, shampoos, and shaving creams are not formulated to be used in or near the vagina. If you are using these products in this area, they may be causing some irritation and dryness. Soaking in a bubble bath can also lead to dryness for many women. Try taking a break from all of these products for a week, and see if your dryness improves. Purchase a non-scented cleanser made just for your intimate area, and make that the only product you use to clean in that area.

In most cases, vaginal dryness can be solved with a simple GYN exam and consultation with your doctor. He or she will help you determine the most likely cause of your dryness and then take steps to resolve it.   

Learn More

Are You At Risk Of Developing Osteoporosis Due To Menopause?

Menopause can spark a lot of changes in your physical health. One surprising change is the development of osteoporosis. The impact of the condition could have a long-term impact on your health. To help you understand menopause and osteoporosis, here is what you need to know. 

What Is the Relation Between Osteoporosis and Menopause?

During menopause, your estrogen levels start to significantly lower. As the levels drop, your bone density starts to lower. Your bones are in a weakened state at that point and are more vulnerable to the consequences of osteoporosis, such as suffering from fractures from simple falls.  

Although osteoporosis is diagnosed after a bone density test, there are some symptoms you should look for that indicate it is time to see your doctor. One of the most noticeable symptoms is back pain and a decrease in your height. You might also find it difficult to maintain good posture, and you can start to take on a stooped posture. 

Early detection of osteoporosis is important. If you have experienced one of these symptoms or have risk factors for developing the condition, get an examination. Risk factors include being over 65 years of age, a family history of the disease, and having a calcium deficiency.  

Your doctor has more options available for treating the condition. The longer you wait to get a diagnosis though, the fewer treatment options there are.  

What Treatment Options Are Available?

There are a number of treatments for menopause, but your doctor’s first action will likely be to prescribe a bisphosphonate. Bisphosphonates work to slow the progression of the bone loss. Your doctor could also prescribe hormone therapy to help with the decrease in estrogen levels.  

There are some serious risks to consider with hormone therapy, such as cancer. Talk over the benefits and risks with your doctor before agreeing to this treatment.  

Depending on the rate of bone loss you have experienced, your doctor might recommend the use of an injectable medication that is designed to rebuild the bone. The drug, teriparatide, is used when you have a high risk of experiencing a fracture. The drug increases the bone mass in your body and helps to strengthen the bone so that fractures are less likely in the future.  

Talk to your doctor about any concerns you have about developing osteoporosis following the beginning of menopause. He or she can help identify whether or not you are at risk and take action to prevent it from occurring. For postmenopausal osteoporosis information, contact a company like Radius.

Learn More

3 Simple Life Changes You Can Make to Prevent Compression Fractures

In order to live a healthy and enjoyable life whilst coping with osteoporosis, it’s important to do everything in your power to prevent compression fractures. Whilst your doctor will be able to prescribe medication to help you, there are a few changes you can make to your life in order to cope with your condition:

Get Upside Down

Inversion therapy is a form of therapy that aims to reverse the pull of gravity on your spine. As you age, gravity can take its toll on your body and this can cause significant damage to the discs and nerves in your spine. If you suffer from osteoporosis, the pull of gravity on your weakened bones can lead to compression fractures if not protected against. As such, inverting on a daily basis can help to reverse the effect on gravity on your body.

If strapping yourself into an inversion table and hanging upside down sounds scary, don’t worry—you can start off slowly. Rather than inverting all the way, you can start at 45° and work your way up to full inversion. This will allow you to ease into the benefits of inverting whilst ensuring that you don’t become overwhelmed.

Stretch Your Spine

In order to prevent osteoporotic fractures, you need to avoid any structural or postural imbalances in the spine. If you put too much load on any particular area of the spine, the discs can become compressed and tight muscles can act to pull the spine out of its natural alignment. As such, you should practice regular deep stretching in order to loosen up your muscles and give your body the flexibility it needs to maintain your spine.

Stretching is also important to ensure that your spine can act as a shock absorber. The suppler your muscles are the larger impact they will be able to absorb without damaging your vertebrae. As such, consider starting a regular stretching routine to help your heal.

Supplement Your Diet

The key to a healthy body is a great diet, but you can improve the effectiveness of your diet through proper supplementation. One of the best supplements you can use to protect against compression fractures is glucosamine sulphate. Glucosamine sulphate has long been recognised as contributing to the growth of cartilage, and strong cartilage is extremely important to support your spine.

In addition to glucosamine sulphate, you should consider adding chondroitin to your diet. Where glucosamine acts to repair damaged cartilage, chondroitin acts to grow completely new cartilage and can increase the flexibility in your spine.  

To learn more, contact services that provide osteoporotic fracture treatments. 

Learn More

Four Tips To Help You Feel Better About An Upcoming Operation

If you’re a little apprehensive about an upcoming surgical procedure, you’re not alone. Whether you are having a minor procedure or major surgery, it’s only natural to feel fearful and worried. But there are things you can do to help alleviate those fears. Here are four ideas to help you feel more confident and less afraid.

Clarify Your Options

If your doctor has recommended surgery, you have the option to seek a second opinion. In fact, some insurance companies require it for certain procedures. Many patients worry they will be offending their physician, but a good doctor will welcome the input from one of his colleagues in the field. Additionally, according to the Patient Advocate Foundation, 30 percent of patients who seek a second opinion for elective surgery and nearly 20 percent of patients whose insurance requires it get an opinion that differs from the original opinion. The differing opinions doesn’t necessarily mean one doctor is wrong, however. It just may be a matter of treatment preferences, with one doctor preferring an aggressive rather than a conservative approach.

A second opinion may also bring to your attention other treatment options that weren’t initially considered. It may also be possible to delay the surgery in some cases. Only a second opinion will potentially present other alternatives.

Choose An Experienced Team

Some surgeons, hospitals, and surgical facilities specialize in certain procedures. Have your primary care physician and the internet help you research who and where may be best for your specific situation. Knowing you have a team of experts tending to your medical needs can go a long way in allaying your fears.

Follow Your Pre-Op Instructions To A Tee

Your pre-op instructions will vary depending on the procedure, surgeon, and facility, but it is extremely important you do exactly what your physician tells you to do. It is common to have to stop blood thinning medications, like aspirin and Coumadin before surgery. It’s also common to not eat or drink anything after midnight the day of the surgery to avoid aspirating while you are under the effects of the anesthesia. Quitting smoking is also recommended at least two weeks before the surgery as it can interfere with the healing process.

Familiarize Yourself With Potential Complications

Chances are, everything will go fine, but surgery and anesthesia have inherent risks associated with them both. Take the responsibility to and do your research. An informed patient s easier for your healthcare team, and it will also provide you with added peace of mind.

Learn More