Are You At Risk Of Developing Osteoporosis Due To Menopause?

Menopause can spark a lot of changes in your physical health. One surprising change is the development of osteoporosis. The impact of the condition could have a long-term impact on your health. To help you understand menopause and osteoporosis, here is what you need to know. 

What Is the Relation Between Osteoporosis and Menopause?

During menopause, your estrogen levels start to significantly lower. As the levels drop, your bone density starts to lower. Your bones are in a weakened state at that point and are more vulnerable to the consequences of osteoporosis, such as suffering from fractures from simple falls.  

Although osteoporosis is diagnosed after a bone density test, there are some symptoms you should look for that indicate it is time to see your doctor. One of the most noticeable symptoms is back pain and a decrease in your height. You might also find it difficult to maintain good posture, and you can start to take on a stooped posture. 

Early detection of osteoporosis is important. If you have experienced one of these symptoms or have risk factors for developing the condition, get an examination. Risk factors include being over 65 years of age, a family history of the disease, and having a calcium deficiency.  

Your doctor has more options available for treating the condition. The longer you wait to get a diagnosis though, the fewer treatment options there are.  

What Treatment Options Are Available?

There are a number of treatments for menopause, but your doctor’s first action will likely be to prescribe a bisphosphonate. Bisphosphonates work to slow the progression of the bone loss. Your doctor could also prescribe hormone therapy to help with the decrease in estrogen levels.  

There are some serious risks to consider with hormone therapy, such as cancer. Talk over the benefits and risks with your doctor before agreeing to this treatment.  

Depending on the rate of bone loss you have experienced, your doctor might recommend the use of an injectable medication that is designed to rebuild the bone. The drug, teriparatide, is used when you have a high risk of experiencing a fracture. The drug increases the bone mass in your body and helps to strengthen the bone so that fractures are less likely in the future.  

Talk to your doctor about any concerns you have about developing osteoporosis following the beginning of menopause. He or she can help identify whether or not you are at risk and take action to prevent it from occurring. For postmenopausal osteoporosis information, contact a company like Radius.

Learn More

3 Simple Life Changes You Can Make to Prevent Compression Fractures

In order to live a healthy and enjoyable life whilst coping with osteoporosis, it’s important to do everything in your power to prevent compression fractures. Whilst your doctor will be able to prescribe medication to help you, there are a few changes you can make to your life in order to cope with your condition:

Get Upside Down

Inversion therapy is a form of therapy that aims to reverse the pull of gravity on your spine. As you age, gravity can take its toll on your body and this can cause significant damage to the discs and nerves in your spine. If you suffer from osteoporosis, the pull of gravity on your weakened bones can lead to compression fractures if not protected against. As such, inverting on a daily basis can help to reverse the effect on gravity on your body.

If strapping yourself into an inversion table and hanging upside down sounds scary, don’t worry—you can start off slowly. Rather than inverting all the way, you can start at 45° and work your way up to full inversion. This will allow you to ease into the benefits of inverting whilst ensuring that you don’t become overwhelmed.

Stretch Your Spine

In order to prevent osteoporotic fractures, you need to avoid any structural or postural imbalances in the spine. If you put too much load on any particular area of the spine, the discs can become compressed and tight muscles can act to pull the spine out of its natural alignment. As such, you should practice regular deep stretching in order to loosen up your muscles and give your body the flexibility it needs to maintain your spine.

Stretching is also important to ensure that your spine can act as a shock absorber. The suppler your muscles are the larger impact they will be able to absorb without damaging your vertebrae. As such, consider starting a regular stretching routine to help your heal.

Supplement Your Diet

The key to a healthy body is a great diet, but you can improve the effectiveness of your diet through proper supplementation. One of the best supplements you can use to protect against compression fractures is glucosamine sulphate. Glucosamine sulphate has long been recognised as contributing to the growth of cartilage, and strong cartilage is extremely important to support your spine.

In addition to glucosamine sulphate, you should consider adding chondroitin to your diet. Where glucosamine acts to repair damaged cartilage, chondroitin acts to grow completely new cartilage and can increase the flexibility in your spine.  

To learn more, contact services that provide osteoporotic fracture treatments. 

Learn More

Four Tips To Help You Feel Better About An Upcoming Operation

If you’re a little apprehensive about an upcoming surgical procedure, you’re not alone. Whether you are having a minor procedure or major surgery, it’s only natural to feel fearful and worried. But there are things you can do to help alleviate those fears. Here are four ideas to help you feel more confident and less afraid.

Clarify Your Options

If your doctor has recommended surgery, you have the option to seek a second opinion. In fact, some insurance companies require it for certain procedures. Many patients worry they will be offending their physician, but a good doctor will welcome the input from one of his colleagues in the field. Additionally, according to the Patient Advocate Foundation, 30 percent of patients who seek a second opinion for elective surgery and nearly 20 percent of patients whose insurance requires it get an opinion that differs from the original opinion. The differing opinions doesn’t necessarily mean one doctor is wrong, however. It just may be a matter of treatment preferences, with one doctor preferring an aggressive rather than a conservative approach.

A second opinion may also bring to your attention other treatment options that weren’t initially considered. It may also be possible to delay the surgery in some cases. Only a second opinion will potentially present other alternatives.

Choose An Experienced Team

Some surgeons, hospitals, and surgical facilities specialize in certain procedures. Have your primary care physician and the internet help you research who and where may be best for your specific situation. Knowing you have a team of experts tending to your medical needs can go a long way in allaying your fears.

Follow Your Pre-Op Instructions To A Tee

Your pre-op instructions will vary depending on the procedure, surgeon, and facility, but it is extremely important you do exactly what your physician tells you to do. It is common to have to stop blood thinning medications, like aspirin and Coumadin before surgery. It’s also common to not eat or drink anything after midnight the day of the surgery to avoid aspirating while you are under the effects of the anesthesia. Quitting smoking is also recommended at least two weeks before the surgery as it can interfere with the healing process.

Familiarize Yourself With Potential Complications

Chances are, everything will go fine, but surgery and anesthesia have inherent risks associated with them both. Take the responsibility to and do your research. An informed patient s easier for your healthcare team, and it will also provide you with added peace of mind.

Learn More

Tips for Helping a Child Overcome a Frontal Lisp

If your child has a lisp, there is a good chance that you want to correct it as soon as possible in order to make sure that he or she can be easily understood by everyone and so that he or she does not get made fun of at school and retains his or her confidence. Here are some tips for helping your child overcome a frontal lisp.

1. Bring Awareness to the Difference Between the ‘S’ Sound and the ‘Th’ Sound

The main symptom of a frontal lisp is that your child is making the ‘th’ sound, rather than the ‘s’ sound when he or she is trying to say words that have the letter ‘s’ in them. The first thing that you need to do to correct this problem is point out to your child that he or she is actually making a different sound than the one that the letter ‘s’ is intended to make. By bringing your child’s awareness to it, you can help correct for it. Say different sounds to your child and make sure that he or she is able to correctly identify which are ‘s’ and ‘z’ sounds and which are the ‘th’ sounds.

2. Show Your Child Where to Place His or Her Tongue

The next thing that you need to do is show your child where to place his or her tongue. Demonstrate with your own tongue and teeth and use a mirror so that your child can really see what is going on. Have your child mimic you and check what he or she is doing with the mirror. Try to make a game out of it.

3. Practice Together

Make a list of words that have the letter ‘s’ in them and make a game out of saying them together. Have your child read out loud to you. During any practicing that you do, make sure that your child is paying attention to the sounds that he or she is making. Put all of your correction efforts into the time that you deliberately set aside for practicing. Otherwise, allow your child to speak normally so that he or she does not become afraid to speak.

4. Talk to a Speech Pathologist

If the lisp does not go away on its own, you may need to talk to a speech pathologist because it could be a muscular problem. Services like Eastern Carolina Ear Nose & Throat-Head can ensure your child has the proper training to overcome the lisp and develop confident in their speech abilities. 

Learn More