Are You At Risk Of Developing Osteoporosis Due To Menopause?

Menopause can spark a lot of changes in your physical health. One surprising change is the development of osteoporosis. The impact of the condition could have a long-term impact on your health. To help you understand menopause and osteoporosis, here is what you need to know. 

What Is the Relation Between Osteoporosis and Menopause?

During menopause, your estrogen levels start to significantly lower. As the levels drop, your bone density starts to lower. Your bones are in a weakened state at that point and are more vulnerable to the consequences of osteoporosis, such as suffering from fractures from simple falls.  

Although osteoporosis is diagnosed after a bone density test, there are some symptoms you should look for that indicate it is time to see your doctor. One of the most noticeable symptoms is back pain and a decrease in your height. You might also find it difficult to maintain good posture, and you can start to take on a stooped posture. 

Early detection of osteoporosis is important. If you have experienced one of these symptoms or have risk factors for developing the condition, get an examination. Risk factors include being over 65 years of age, a family history of the disease, and having a calcium deficiency.  

Your doctor has more options available for treating the condition. The longer you wait to get a diagnosis though, the fewer treatment options there are.  

What Treatment Options Are Available?

There are a number of treatments for menopause, but your doctor’s first action will likely be to prescribe a bisphosphonate. Bisphosphonates work to slow the progression of the bone loss. Your doctor could also prescribe hormone therapy to help with the decrease in estrogen levels.  

There are some serious risks to consider with hormone therapy, such as cancer. Talk over the benefits and risks with your doctor before agreeing to this treatment.  

Depending on the rate of bone loss you have experienced, your doctor might recommend the use of an injectable medication that is designed to rebuild the bone. The drug, teriparatide, is used when you have a high risk of experiencing a fracture. The drug increases the bone mass in your body and helps to strengthen the bone so that fractures are less likely in the future.  

Talk to your doctor about any concerns you have about developing osteoporosis following the beginning of menopause. He or she can help identify whether or not you are at risk and take action to prevent it from occurring. For postmenopausal osteoporosis information, contact a company like Radius.